What does Disposable Teens mean?

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Marilyn Manson: Disposable Teens Meaning

Song Released: 2000


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Disposable Teens Lyrics

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And Im a black rainbow
And Im an ape of god
I got a face thats made for violence upon
Im a teen distortion
Survived abortion
A rebel from the waist down

I wanna thank you mom
I wanna thank you dad
For bringing this fucking world
To a...

  1.  

    anonymous
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    Feb 4th, 2018 2:58pm report


    An MM song who rebelled against the media and the educational systems of our society, along with the Teens parents that should've also taken some of the responsibility for making and turning out, so called deplorable and ''Disposable Teens'' Where MM is symphatizing and relating in symbolic rainbow form, with the black,white,red,purple,blue and yellow colored teenagers who were influenced and taught inside these infiltrated Institutions by Those left wing radical Revolutionary ''Je[w]suits''. Working for and within these ungodly men made educational systems of this world that endoctrinated them kids with a radicalized Darwinian lifestyle. By which made them feel and think their vision and belief of themselves in God was related to the ape Animal more, instead of the one Creator God that created them kids in His image, Not like from some ape ''man-god'' to become that they evolutionized the kids to believe in. As their conjured up Darwinian humanism ideology. Where now this ideology sadly, only gave power to Animalistic thinking in certain kids that unfortunately decided the only way out was to destroy life in this corrupted and ungodly systems of our own making that took it all away from ''the disposable teens'' in the first place.



  2.  

    anonymous
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    Oct 16th, 2014 10:31am report


    I actually related this to the "lost generation" which appeared after World War I. Hemingway and other writers wrote about life in this time, eg The Sun Also Rises. The idea is this generation was losing faith in what society long held sacred - in the power of God, the state, and the infallibility of authority.



  3.  

    anonymous
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    Apr 15th, 2012 4:29pm report


    Don't be surprised... kids are just threatening but they are rebels from the waist down, so the only way they can rebel is through sexual acts, they no longer believe in any revolutions (you're full of shit). They won't believe it cause the world is at the bitter end anyways. Hence, why change anything.
    Another thought that occurred to me - can it be revolutions are caused by, so to speak, testosterone? The hunger for power, domination over 'the tribe'? Then the rebel from the waist down... someone who is driven by sex drive but justifies it with cheap talk about shaking the status quo.



  4.  

    anonymous
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    Dec 13th, 2011 12:57pm report


    This song is a satire of rebellious teenagers. Many teens try to "go against the man" by being different for the sake of difference, and try to conflate being a rebel with being a revolutionary.

    "And I am a black rainbow" starts the song by giving a statement which might make an individual seem "deep" and "misunderstood". As one might say, they appear dark on the outside, but that is simply because the multiple colors of their personality clash when mixed together.

    "And I'm an ape of god" implicitly shows that they believe evolution to be true and god to be false. Since the literal interpretation of the Judeo-Christian story of origins is false, F*CK GOD!

    "I've got a face that's made for violence upon" shows their willingness to use violence against 'the man'. This is a more explicit example of trying to confuse rebellion with revolution.

    "And I'm a teen distortion" is an expression of them being outside of what is considered a 'normal' teen. If the image of a normal teen was in an ordinary mirror, their image would be in a smoked, broken, warped mirror.

    "Survived abortion" tries to make it sound like they've overcome a great feat. "Survive" usually implies some sort of effort, but not being aborted takes no effort by yourself whatsoever. The societal push towards keeping the pregnancy, the society the teen is fighting against, is the one that influenced his mother to have him in the first place.

    "A rebel from the waist down" is a reference to 1984. During a thought process in which the main character, Winston, observes how uninterested his lover, Julian, is in causing a revolution and is willing to be a sexual rebel working within the status quo, he is prompted to tell her that she is "a rebel from the waist downwards." This, along with sticking with the idea of confusing rebellion with revolution, can also be seen as teens taking a pro-choice stance, sex positive, or gay/lesbian/bi/straight tolerance as their way of being different.

    The "yeahs" are the encouragement and affirmation from their peers.

    "I wanna thank you mom / I wanna thank you dad / for bringing this f--kin world to a bitter end" shows an extreme narcissism and egomania present in some teens. Teens who think they are going to singlehandedly overturn the world.

    "I never really hated one true god / But the god of the people I hated" exemplifies teens who take a position to oppose the stance someone they dislike takes. They aren't an atheist because they philosophically went through all of the propositions that believing in god consists of, but because they can't possibly be wearing the same belief the conformist is!

    "You say you wanted evolution / The ape was a great big hit" is where Manson starts voicing his opinion towards teens. He says that most people already accept evolution, and you're rebelling against a minority when taking evolution as your edgy position of the day.

    "You say you want a revolution, man / And I say that you're full of s--t" is when Manson shows that he doesn't believe that rebellious teenagers want actual change.

    The repetition of "We're disposable teens" expresses that the type of mindlessly rebellious teenager is garbage, and could easily be rid of.

    "The more that you fear us / The bigger we get" says that teenage rebellion is only encourage and made more attractive by authorities trying to shove it down

    "Don't be surprised when we destroy all of it" says that teenagers usually get over their anti-conformist fad, and don't be surprised when they move on and grow up.



  5.  

    anonymous
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    Apr 12th, 2009 4:11pm report


    Disposable Teens is, as the title suggests, about the uncaring towards teens. Anyone remember his interview in Bowling For Columbine, when he said he's listen to the murderers in the Columbine high school massacre, unlike everyone else?

    It's treating kids like shit. It keeps the evolution/revolution theme going, as well, with some stabs at stupid kids. "You say you want a revolution, man / And I say you're just full of shit" By the time teens become adults, the "revolution" they wanted against the adult sis gone, and they've "evolved" into the people that discard teens.



  6.  

    DisposableCartman
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    May 12th, 2008 5:56pm report


    I can't believe no one's thrown this one out there yet.

    Anyway, this song is about in society when you're a kid, and you're not even consider human until you're eighteen, or you're "disposable". This song addresses Columbine, as well:

    "The more that you fear us/the bigger we get/
    the more that you fear us/ the bigger we get/
    and don't be surprised/ don't be surprised/
    don't be surprised when we destroy all of this"

    You can't use kids who are arleady oppressed enough as social tools, and then expect them to stay clean and smiling.

    I might add that this song borrows a lyric from the Beatles song "Revolution", the line "you say you wanna evolution". Mostly because this album has many references to John Lennon, as well as JFK. Mostly JFK.

    Most kids are so stupid, though, that they wouldn't understand the reference to the George Orwell book "1984", which is the line "a rebel from the waste down".

    Also, Manson offers his true belief about God in this song:
    "I never really hated a one true God/ but the God of the people I hated"

    The music video had to be alternated in some places, due to the fact that the Catholics didn't like the image of Manson in a pope's hat, and a monkey swinging on a crucifix. The same monkey, later in the music video, sits at the Last Supper table.

    PS: This song was used in the opening titles of the film Shadows: Blair Witch 2", and was the first single off of Holy Wood.




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