What does 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy) mean?

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Simon & Garfunkel: 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy) Meaning

Song Released: 1968


59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy) Lyrics

Slow down, you move too fast.
You got to make the morning last.
Just kicking down the cobble stones.
Looking for fun and feeling groovy.

Ba da, Ba da, Ba da, Ba da...Feeling Groovy.

Hello lamp-post,
What'cha knowing?
I've come to watch...

  1.  

    anonymous
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    Aug 21st, 2015 8:18am report


    Jonah Falcon is right. In fact, both Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel confirmed this. Anyone from New York City knows this.



  2.  

    anonymous
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    Apr 22nd, 2014 4:40am report


    Life can be "groovy" when you manage to get out of the grove you are stuck in. Its not saying duck out of responsibilities, but if there's nothing you need to or can do right now, choose to do something different. So slow down, look at the flowers, allow yourself to act "out of character", take risks, talk to strangers, even strange objects like lamp-posts.



  3.  

    anonymous
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    Jan 7th, 2012 1:55pm report


    This song is about living life to the full and not letting depressing daily routines slow you down. The song implies that people should trust their instincts and follow their ambitions, and have fun while they're doing so, "kicking down the cobble stones, looking for fun and feeling groovy". The song also suggests that people can survive on their own by trusting nature and having a positive attitude, "let the morning time drop all its petals on me, life I love you, all is groovy.



  4.  

    anonymous
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    Nov 24th, 2011 11:35am report


    No long or deep explanation is needed for this song. It is simply and brilliantly about slowing down and enjoying life. Instead of rushing around in a world of "have to," take your time and enjoy life all around you, watch the flowers grow.



  5.  

    anonymous
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    Sep 15th, 2011 9:56am report


    Within the context of the rest of the album this song sounds extremely sarcastic. All the joyful references are disparaging a peaceful utopia that will never exist.



  6.  

    anonymous
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    Feb 11th, 2011 2:48pm report


    From 59th st don't you reach Manhattan from Brooklyn, crossing the river? Could the singer be going into NYC for a day of fun? Where are the cobblestones he kicks down on his way?



  7.  

    anonymous
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    May 18th, 2008 5:07pm report


    This is also a social commentary on the counter culture movement during the 60's. The wide spread belief was to just enjoy life and not worry. The protagonist is most likely high. This can be seen when he starts talking to the lamp post.



  8.  

    anonymous
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    Apr 29th, 2008 4:34pm report


    This song is not about the lack of communication but it simply celebrates and praises life in general- 'life I love you'. a very rejoiceful tone is integrated with the language; one can discern the composer's joy by the way he commends simple inanimate objects and interacts with them- 'hello lampost...'- which reflects the songwriter's sense of composure or psychological tranquility. He celebrates and talks about how nobody is effectively imposing any responsibilities or obligations on us. 'i got no...promises to keep'- another means of expressing his joy.



  9.  

    JonahFalcon
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    May 19th, 2006 5:26am report


    The song, like most Simon & Garfunkel songs, is about lack of communication, this time taking place during a traffic jam on the 59th Street Bridge in Manhattan, which happens frequently during a morning rush hour going to work. During a traffic jam, drivers are trying to drive fast even though it's physically impossible to go anywhere -- and no one communicates during a jam, even though there's nothing going on. The protagonist is begging the listener to enjoy the delay -- essentially, "We're stuck here. Let's talk!", comparing the stolid listenr to a "lamp post". The jam removes all obligations ("I've got no deeds to do, no promises to keep") and even affords a chance to take a snooze. The protagonist is insisting that a traffic jam is to be savored as a gift, not a hindrance.




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